logo
g Text Version
Beauty & Self
Books & Music
Career
Computers
Education
Family
Food & Wine
Health & Fitness
Hobbies & Crafts
Home & Garden
Money
News & Politics
Relationships
Religion & Spirituality
Sports
Travel & Culture
TV & Movies

dailyclick
Bored? Games!
Nutrition
Postcards
Take a Quiz
Rate My Photo

new
European Travel
Action Movies
Bible Basics
Houseplants
Romance Movies
Creativity
Family Travel


dailyclick
All times in EST

Autism Spectrum Disorders: 4:00 PM

Full Schedule
g
g Mental Health Site

BellaOnline's Mental Health Editor

g

Social Anxiety Disorder - SAD

Guest Author - Carissa Vaughn

What is Social Anxiety Disorder (aka SAD)? Social Anxiety is defined primarily, of course, to the reference in the name of one having difficulty with anxiety in social settings. What surprises many however, are the varying degrees and locales for some in which the emotions may occur.

Things as simple as going to the grocery store become terrifying, no need to even mention large crowds. It can even include, for some, just chatting on the phone or via the internet. The stress level and feeling of being out of control can overcome logical reasoning and lead one to a life of solitude. Television usually nonthreatening, animals a comfort and often you'll find their home a horde of books and puzzles or games of some sort or another (maybe just a deck of cards.)
Keep in mind that this kind of anxiety occurs for most people every day. Hoping that person walking past won't say hello, standing in an elevator with a couple of others, giving speeches, not wanting to be called on in a class or meeting, etc.

How does Social Anxiety begin and why? Research shows that more often than not, these individuals have suffered some form of abuse or personal trauma. A diagnosis of depression is also consistently present. A tortured mind, feelings of loneliness, sadness and hopelessness pervade the thought life and it just becomes easier to stay at home or be in bed.

There are those with different circumstances that may revolve around a very protected, sheltered environment growing up - where one may not be able to learn proper coping skills due to 'babying,' criticism or overprotection from parents. Some personalities are simply shy. This category of men and women are usually very meek, introverted people. They are hesitant in decision making and unassertive. This frequently leads to being 'taken advantage of' by others, verbal and/or emotional abuse, and possibly ridicule. This already looks like a recipe for social anxiety that many can understand!

How on earth does one overcome such a day to day obstacle? This is frustrating for the individual with the experiences and for the family and friends on the outside watching, who can't fathom the idea of not wanting to be around other people!

Some tips to help:

#1 - Please see a professional! There are psychologists and social workers who go to school for special training to help those suffering in this way. It may be that a psychiatrist will need to be involved for medication issues and they can help facilitate this effort and also assist in interfacing with your family

#2 - Take the time to figure out your triggers. What am I doing or thinking at the time I start to feel anxious? Who is around me? What kind of setting am I in? What am I reflecting on internally? Make a list. As you recognize those things and patterns as they arise the thoughts can be easier to avoid and to stop dead in their tracks when they begin.

#3 - Invest in yourself. "Me time." The power of positive thinking is no myth.The battlefield of the mind is an intense place where you CAN win. You are beautiful! You are unique! You are in control!

#4 - Avoid stimulants. Seems like a no brainer - but it sure is a possible trigger for a myriad of people. Caffeine, nicotine, illicit substances, herbs and certain prescription and over the counter medications.

#5 - Spend some time outside every day. Even if its just for ten minutes at a time. The benefit of sunlight can improve mood and motivate you with the control you exert over your emotions for that period of time every day. Exercising every day before dinner time is a great way to release pent up anxiety, to force your mind to essentially become 'mindless' to focus on the task at hand, and to increase endorphins - which improve mood.
Add Social+Anxiety+Disorder+%2D+SAD to Twitter Add Social+Anxiety+Disorder+%2D+SAD to Facebook Add Social+Anxiety+Disorder+%2D+SAD to MySpace Add Social+Anxiety+Disorder+%2D+SAD to Del.icio.us Digg Social+Anxiety+Disorder+%2D+SAD Add Social+Anxiety+Disorder+%2D+SAD to Yahoo My Web Add Social+Anxiety+Disorder+%2D+SAD to Google Bookmarks Add Social+Anxiety+Disorder+%2D+SAD to Stumbleupon Add Social+Anxiety+Disorder+%2D+SAD to Reddit




RSS | Related Articles | Editor's Picks Articles | Top Ten Articles | Previous Features | Site Map


For FREE email updates, subscribe to the Mental Health Newsletter


Past Issues


print
Printer Friendly
bookmark
Bookmark
tell friend
Tell a Friend
forum
Forum
email
Email Editor


Content copyright © 2014 by Carissa Vaughn. All rights reserved.
This content was written by Carissa Vaughn. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Dr. Jonice Webb for details.

g


g features
People Don't Change

Emotionally Unavailable

What is Self-Worth

Archives | Site Map

forum
Forum
email
Contact

Past Issues
memberscenter


vote
Poetry
Daily
Weekly
Monthly
Less than Monthly



BellaOnline on Facebook
g


| About BellaOnline | Privacy Policy | Advertising | Become an Editor |
Website copyright © 2014 Minerva WebWorks LLC. All rights reserved.


BellaOnline Editor