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Anxiety, Depression and Chronic Worry

Guest Author - James M. Lowrance

by: James M. "JimLow" Lowrance


The chronic worry aspect of anxiety is what is most often mistakenly referred to as depression, when it is actually a fear emotion. Fear of the future, fear about health, finances etc., and though it is not in the depression category, worry can result in depression due to the prolonged periods of stress it causes.


To better illustrate this, let’s look at a couple of example scenarios. In the first one, we have a man, with a very important business meeting coming up. In this meeting, he will be required to convince the heads of his company that his past accomplishments merit him a promotion to a more important, advanced position with the firm. The meeting is two weeks away and yet the man has such hopes in doing well at the meeting, that he worries himself sick during the entire two weeks leading up to the meeting. Family or friends observing his period of chronic worry, might make the remark, “He sure has been depressed these past two weeks.” The fact is, the man was experiencing a manifestation of anxiety, called chronic worry, being triggered by a fear of failure.


In a second example scenario, we have a woman who does lose a long held position she had with a prestigious firm. This causes her to sink into a deep feeling of profound loss, that she feels she cannot recoupe from. She has continual feelings of sadness and has constant crying spells. An observer remarks, “She has just been a bundle of nerves since losing her job and she’s really going through an anxious time right now.” In reality, the woman’s experience is more so in the depression category because she is experiencing profound sadness over losing her long held position.


While we may be able to better place these examples of emotional scenarios into either the anxiety or depression categories, we also realize that both of these people very likely also experienced aspects of the other emotion as well. Again, this demonstrates how closely related these emotions are and how they often co-exist and can also fuel each other, causing worsening symptoms of each.


Thankfully, there are treatments that help both emotional disorders simultaneously, such as SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors)antidepressants, that are designed to help patients with both anxiety and depression, or either of them. There are also treatments, such as “Cognitive Behavioral Therapy," that offers coping and overcoming skills, for both anxiety and depression.


People experiencing these common emotional disorders and the family, friends and associates of these patients, should be aware of how commonly these disorders co-exist but should also learn about the major features that help distinguish them.


Author Bio:

James Mark Lowrance "JimLow"

Age: 44

Married: 23 years (6-25-1983), to wife Jan

Occupation: I'm a contract salesperson, since 1989.
I have a patented fishing accessory I invented on the market, carried by Bass Pro, Academy and Cabela's but at one time was regionally carried by Wal-Marts for 6 years. Website: www.jimlowsaudios.com/anxietyaudio .html , featuring articles on emotional disorders and thyroid disease. I also offer audios on these subjects.

My Diagnosis: I was diagnosed in early 2003 with hypothyroidism but was seeking help for symptoms, in 2002. Symptoms were: fatigue (the big one), anxiety, depression, joint pain, dry skin, red flush on face, hives etc... and it is my experience with these disorders that has given me a passion to help inform others who suffer with them.


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Content copyright © 2014 by James M. Lowrance. All rights reserved.
This content was written by James M. Lowrance. If you wish to use this content in any manner, you need written permission. Contact Dr. Jonice Webb for details.

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