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BellaOnline's Deafness Editor

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 F E A T U R E   A R C H I V E  

Archive by Date | Archive by Article Title

Hearing loss self-evaluation
Are there some situations where you feel you are not hearing as well as you should? Here’s a self-evaluation which may help you decide whether to seek professional help and have your hearing checked.

Deafness Denial
Nagging someone about their inability to hear generally does not help and often has the opposite effect. It does not get the person to take a hearing test if they have a loss.

I'm not deaf!
Age-related deafness is gradual, often slow and at first not even noticed. Family, friends and work colleagues are usually the first to notice a difference.

Help hearing people help you
Isolation is not a solution to avoid communication. Ask people (your family) how they would like to communicate with you. Help your family to know how best to attract your attention. It is a learning process for everyone and patience is needed by all of us.

Gradual Hearing Loss
Someone who has a gradual hearing loss goes through many stages and these are some of the characteristics.

Recognising Hearing People
Recognising the effort and changes that hearing people need to make when someone goes gradually deaf can help with communication.

Hearing loss support groups
Mixing with people who understand what it’s like to lose hearing provides a social atmosphere where embarrassment is removed. These people are more sympathetic and will take the time to listen and help. You are not alone.

Hearing Dogs
At the Disability Expo in Adelaide Australia, last week a Cochlear Implantee brought along her Hearing Dog. I asked her why, since she can now hear very well, did she need a hearing dog.

Deaf or Blind
I meet many people and they often say to me I am ‘lucky’ because I lost my hearing and not my vision. They tell me it would be far easier to live with deafness than blindness. I’ve often wondered why they should think this when the issues of being deaf are complex.

Living with Deafness
With one in six people having some form of deafness and even more as we age it means that almost every family or households are touched by deafness. This is a true story about how one family had been affected by deafness.

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